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Product Care



How to care for your new clothing, shoes and accessories: 

Jump to sections: Footwear - Clothing - Accessories

 

How to care for your new gravitypope footwear

We love shoes and want to see your investments last. From a basic canvas slip-on to the most intricate pair of dress shoes there are steps to keep your footwear looking its best.


The number one thing to remember is to avoid excessive moisture. Water and perspiration break down the materials in a shoe. If you do get your shoes wet, dry the outside with a towel and let them air out at room temperature. Never dry them with hot air or put them in front of a heating vent as this removes natural oils from leather and can cause the sole to split. With shoes that are waterproof, feet will sweat more, and that moisture is trapped inside the shoe. Try to let the inside of the shoe dry out between wears to preserve its longevity. One of the best things you can do to keep your shoes in great condition is to have two or more pairs! Let your shoes rest between wears and they’ll last much longer.

The information provided on this page is for educational purposes only and we cannot guarantee all products and practices mentioned will work on every shoe. Our staff can always answer any questions you may have regarding a particular make and model. Email customercare@gravitypope.com for advice or call your nearest location. 

 

Three Easy Steps for Basic Leather Shoe Care

Everyday - Keep your shoes dry and dirt free. Store your shoes in a cool, dry place, away from excessive light. Use a bristle brush or rag to remove dirt from the upper. Shoe trees preserve the shape of the shoe by preventing creasing and the toes from curling upwards. Always use a shoehorn to prevent crushing the heel of your shoes.  If you get your leather shoes wet and they have been exposed to road salt, spray the shoes all over with a mixture of 1-part white vinegar to 3-parts water. This will prevent white stains and scars from occurring on the leather.

Every couple of weeks - Spray your shoes with an all-protector to waterproof and moisturize the leather. This will prevent liquids from penetrating and damaging the leather. If you get them wet, make sure to spray them as soon as they’re dry or after you have removed any dirt or spills.

Every couple of months - Clean and condition smooth leather with a moisturizing leather cleaner. This will remove dirt and restore natural oils to the leather. If colour is fading or scratched, apply a matching colour or neutral polish and buff to a shine with a soft cloth. Always re-spray with all-protector after using leather cleaner or polish. Follow extra care instructions for special leathers such as suede, nubuck or patent.

 

Extra care for special leathers

Suede - Use a suede block or brush to remove any dirt from the shoe and restore the nap of the suede. A suede block and a dry brushing can restore suede when you get your suede shoes dirty. Never wear suede with wet jeans, the indigo dye is almost impossible to remove. There are also suede renewel products that work great on black or dark brown suede. It is essentially a spray polish that rejuvenates the colour and restores the texture of the suede.

Nubuck - Use a nubuck block to restore the nap of nubuck that is dirty or has been smoothed down by wear. Sometimes people wax or oil their nubuck or it comes oiled from the designer. A small amount of leather wax or oil can be applied to nubuck to make it water repellent. Apply more of the product around the sole of the shoe and gradually move it around the entire upper.

Patent Leather - Patent leather has been covered with a layer of varnish to make the leather glossy. Use Patent Leather Cleaner to clean and protect your patent shoes. Normal all-protector will damage patent leathers shine over time. Using shoe trees or stuffing patent shoes are critical to prevent creasing and excessive wear.
 

Care for your sole

Leather soles will disintegrate quickly when they get wet. If a leather soled shoe gets wet, do not wear the shoe again until it has completely dried out.

Toppies - the best protection for your leather-soled shoes. Bring your leather-soled shoes to a cobbler to have them toppied. This is a thin rubber sole that is applied to the bottom of leather-soled shoes. Toppies will prevent the bottom of your shoe from absorbing moisture. Toppies also give you extra grip, so if you're planning on dancing in your new leather-soled shoes, a Topy is highly recommended. Toppies can be applied to any leather sled shoe or boot for a very reasonable price at any established cobbler.

Re-soling - Many leather soles shoes can be re-soled if one does not like the feel of a topy on a shoe. A complete re-soling of a show will be more expensive than replacing a topy.

 

Hardware Help

Elastics/Gussets - Use a shoehorn with new Chelsea style boots to preserve the gusset while the leather upper (the leather across the top of the foot) stretches.

Eyelets – Sometimes eyelets have sharp edges and can be filed down easily to prevent shoelaces from catching on them.

Screw Rivets – Screw rivets are used by some designers as a shoe clasp. They are great because they can be moved to adjust the fit of the shoe when needed. However, they need to periodically be tightened or they may fall off the shoe. Alternatively, you can glue in the rivet with a bit of adhesive to hold it in place more securely.

Shoelaces – Grab a bowl and a brush. Add enough Jason Markk shoe cleaner to the water to create bubbles, and submerge your laces in the water. Soak them for 15 to 20 minutes, moving the laces through the water with your hands every so often. Any stains that are still visible should scrub away easily with your brush. Repeat if necessary and air dry.

Top Lifts – The rubber piece attached to the heel of a shoe. To avoid costly repairs, it is important to replace the top lift on a shoe before wearing down into the heel. Otherwise, a cobbler will attempt to rebuild the heel to rebalance the shoes which can become expensive.

Zippers – Always zip up footwear by pulling the zipper tab outwards and upwards to unlock the zipper. Zippers will generally do up easier if you are standing. Metal zippers look great but are not as flexible as plastic zippers and may jam or break more easily. If a zipper is sticking, run a graphite pencil up and down the teeth of both sides of the zipper to lubricate it. Zippers in the back of a boot may split more easily than zippers on the side of a boot, especially if you have a high arch or instep that creates additional pressure on the zipper. If you get your zippers dirty, clean the zipper teeth with a bristly brush to remove debris that otherwise can cause the zipper to split.

 

Sneaker Care

Canvas Preventive Measures - Straight out of the box, using a product like Jason Markk's Repel shoe spray will keep dirt and dust off the canvas and soles so you have less work to do down the line. Also keeping Jason Markk's Quick Wipes on hand is important for quick cleans of your favourite shoes on the go.

Canvas Cleaning - A washing machine is the most powerful shoe cleaner you own. Most canvas sneakers can be put into the washing machine, just make sure to use cold water, as warm water sets stains and can deform the rubber soles. If your sneakers have any form of leather or suede on them, the washing machine is not recommended. This is also true for any shoes embellished with trim, beading, or rope soles. If the washing machine did not work, hand cleaning is the next option, and using a specific shoe-focused cleaner is recommended. Using Jason Markk's Premium Shoe Cleaner is a great option as it's a gentle cleaning product that does an excellent job of both conditioning and cleaning footwear, while avoiding harsh chemicals with 98.3% natural ingredients.

Take out your laces and add a small but reasonable amount of cleaner into a bowl with water. Wet a shoe brush with the soapy water and start scrubbing your shoes, keep dipping back into the bowl as necessary. To clean your laces, put the laces into the bowl and let sit, then rinse. Let dry once clean.

EVA (Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate) - Generally, any shoe made with EVA, a rubbery elastic material that's used to create soft and flexible foam, should always be hand-washed. The material is prone to absorbing water, which can change how the sneaker’s cushioning works. Spot cleaning is always the least risky way to clean sneakers. Doing so will extend the life of your sneakers.

PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) - Firstly, do not place PVC products next to leather garments as these may cause permanent stains, so if you bundle your shoe together in the closet, make sure to keep leather away from PVC. Cleaning PVC shoes is simple, use a clean damp cloth, and let dry completely before wear. Do not use stain removers as they take the finish off of the PVC.

Cork - The number one thing to avoid for the lifespan of a pair of cork soles shoes is water. Avoid wearing them in the rain, and avoid puddles, as this wears down the midsoles of the shoe quicker. If water is unavoidable, make sure to dry out quickly. As for cleaning cork-soled shoes, using a mixture of two tablespoons of water with one tablespoon of baking soda and applying/scrubbing with a cloth or toothbrush is the best bet for keeping the cork bright. After cleaning is complete, using a cork sealant like Barge Cement on the exposed cork will create a strong barrier to water.

To apply the barge cement, let them dry completely after cleaning and use a cheap foam paintbrush to spread around a small amount of the barge cement on the cork. If the suede insole is peeling, you can apply barge cement underneath the suede and press down. Let cure overnight, and they will be good to wear in the morning.

Wool - Gentle handwashing is the best bet for wool shoes, using cold water. Start by dusting off any dirt with a soft brush, like the Redecker Cashmere Brush. For areas that have stains or discoloration, use a very mild soap to wash them, like Myssy's Wool Wash. Mix a solution of water and the mild detergent in a bowl or dish and take a clean rag or cloth and dip it in the solution, then use the rag to dab the wool surface. Don’t submerge the wool or soak it in water. When you’re finished cleaning, use a clean dry cloth to dab any remaining moisture which will help the shoes or slippers dry faster.

For suede sole models, see our suede cleaning and protection section.

Satin -  The term satin does not refer to a particular type of fiber, but rather to a method of weaving fibers in a way that produces an especially smooth, glossy surface. That means satin clothes can be made from a handful of different fabrics, from silk to polyester. Always check the care label to make sure you're cleaning the garment properly.

Satin is a very delicate textile to work with, so using a washing machine, delicate bag, and gentle detergent is recommended for washing machine-appropriate clothing. If you cannot use a washing machine, handwashing is also safe. Use cold water and air dry flat, never wring out. For stains, make sure you pretreat with an enzyme-based stain remover and let sit for 10 minutes before washing.

Sequins/beading - Most clothing with embellishments like sequins or beading will state dry cleaning only, but every time you take it to a cleaner or wash it yourself damages the accents by causing them to become dull or loosen from the fabric. Try spot cleaning instead by only using a cotton swab with a water/detergent mix in certain areas that need cleaning, like a stain. If the whole garment requires cleaning, taking it to a dry cleaner will help prolong the garment's life over washing at home.

Rubber - There's no avoiding dirt and debris with rubber shoes/soles, luckily they're pretty easy to clean. We recommend using a 1:1 mixture of baking soda and detergent to clean rubber soles. Firstly remove excess dirt by brushing, then use your mixture and a damp sponge to wash the rubber. Then use a different sponge or cloth to remove the cleaning solution thoroughly. Next, dry the shoe completely, and repeat if necessary. For tough stains that don't come out using this method, you can use nail polish remover and cotton balls to spot-clean the rubber.

Fur - Fur should never be cleaned at home, and always be cleaned by either a professional furrier or a dry cleaner who specializes in cleaning fur coats once a year. Cleaning once per year will condition the leather without stripping the natural oils of the fur. Washing at home will strip the oils, ruin the pelt, and destroy the structure of the coat itself. Preventative measures can be taken like using a broad, sturdy, padded hanger to keep the shoulders from losing their shape and using a cotton bag when hanging to keep dust off it. Never hang with a plastic bag as that can trap moisture and ruin the pelt. If caught in the rain, make sure you hang it in a well-ventilated room to dry before storing it.

Gortex & other waterproof membrane products - Washing is easy and can be done in the washing machine but should be done regularly to keep water repellency active. Firstly, zip all zippers and button all buttons. Machine wash at 105°F or 40°C using a liquid detergent. Never use powder detergents, fabric softeners, stain removers, or bleach. Then line dry or dry in the dryer on the gentle/warm cycle. After completely dry, tumble dry on the normal setting for a further 20 minutes to reactivate the DWR (Durable Water Repellant) treatment. You can do this step any time you notice the water repellency needs a boost. If water seems to soak in after washing, you can reapply the DWR layer with a product of your choice.

Quilted - Always read the manufacturer's label before washing a garment. If the tag says dry clean only, trust it. For quilted garments, we recommend hand washing as the stitches can be delicate, and there's lots of stitching. Before washing your quilt, pre-treat any stains with a commercial stain remover and let sit for 10 minutes. Fill a deep laundry sink or bathtub with cold water and a gentle liquid detergent. Be certain that the sink or tub is clean and has no residue from cleaning agents, which could cause damage to the quilt. Allow the quilt to soak in the water for about 10 minutes, while gently agitating. Drain and rinse then air dry.

Shearling - Firstly, check if your shearling is faux or real. Faux shearling often contains polyester fibers along with wool. Cleaning faux shearling is typically easy as most items are usually machine-washable; just follow the instructions on the care label. For real shearling, treat stains immediately as stains can be difficult to get out of shearling once dry.

To refresh the wool, Mix a solution of warm water and 1/2 a teaspoon of Myssy's wool wash, and dip a cloth into the solution. Starting at the top of the garment, gently wipe down the wooly surfaces. Rinse the cloth often and mix a fresh batch of the cleaning solution as the soil is transferred if needed.

To deep clean the wool (not always necessary) mix a solution of lukewarm water and wool wash in a large sink or bathtub. Follow the product label guidelines as to how much to use per gallon of water. Submerge the shearling and gently squeeze the solution through the fibers for about 10 minutes. Drain the soapy water and refill the tub with cool water. Rinse by squeezing the shearling until no more suds appear. You may need to empty and refill the tub a couple of times. Lift the shearling out of the tub and gently squeeze to remove water. Do not wring! Place the shearling between two towels to help absorb excess water. Place the shearling on a drying rack and smooth it to its original shape. It is helpful to stuff boots, slippers, and purses with clean cotton towels to help them hold their shape. Replace the towels as they become wet. Allow the shearling item to air dry completely before wearing.

For the suede side of the shearling, see our suede guide.

 

Storing Footwear

Sneakers - Storing sneakers in the box they came in or on shoe racks will help keep things organized, however, if stored for a long time, the paper and cardboard in those boxes, or the outside air can dry out the shoes. Its better to store them in individual plastic boxes, which can be stacked easily, and lock in moisture. Always clean before long-term storage, and use shoe trees to keep their shape. Never store them beside another pair of shoes, as the colours can bleed over time.

Leather - Very similar to sneakers, except that leather shoes need room to breathe. Storing them in the box they came in or in a shoe bag is preferred. Always clean before long-term storage, and use shoe trees to keep their shape. Never store them beside another pair of shoes, as the colours can bleed over time. It is handy to store shoes in specific ways so remembering where they are is easy. For example, storing all your high heels together.

 

Local Shoe Cobblers in Each City

Please note these are our recommendations only based on our personal relationships with these businesses. gravitypope is not responsible for the repairs done by the following businesses.

Vancouver:

Calgary:

Edmonton:

Toronto:

 

Clothing Overview:

  • Follow care instruction on the garments tag (see graphic below).
  • Treat potential stains immediately by rinsing the area in cold water. Some mild dish soap can be used for oil based stains.
  • Avoid rubbing stained area with a cloth as it can work the stain into the fabric.
  • Warm / Hot water sets stains, if garment is stained, wash with cold water and a cold water detergent.
  • Washing frequency is a personal choice, but over-washing can be bad for the garment.
  • Avoid the dryer as much as possible. They break down the fibres of the fabric and can cause the garment to shrink and age prematurely. The dryer will also set in any stains that were not removed in the washing process.

 

Denim 

  • Denim wears and patinas with use, making it an extremely personal product. Everything you do to them, including washing, will affect how they look down the road. Keep this in mind when breaking in a new pair of denim jeans.
  • Wearing raw denim consistently and not washing them will give you a more interesting pair of jeans down the road.
  • Alternatively, washing will not hurt them, and turning jeans inside out will protect the colour.
  • Always hang to dry.
  • Wash denim separately as to not colour swap.

 

Delicates 

  • Be delicate with your delicates. Do not ignore the hand washing instructions.
  • Wash like colours together in cool water.
  • Fill a basin with cool water and a gentle detergent (Tangent, drop of mild dish soap).
  • Swirl the laundry a few times over an hour.
  • Gently squeeze out excess water.
  • Dry on a drying rack .

 

Swimwear

  • Always soak in water after use, the saltwater/chlorine breaks down the fibres and elasticity of the garment.
  • When removing water from your swimwear be sure to squish instead of wring.

Storage

  • To help knits keep their shape, always fold vs. hang.
  • Avoid overstuffing your closets as it will encourage wrinkles.
  • Zip your zippers and button your buttons.

 

Wool 

  • Hand wash on cool and use a gentle detergent like Myssy’s Wool Wash.
  • Gently squeeze the water out, do not wring, as that can stretch out and warp the fibres.
  • Dry the item out on towels, and roll up the towels with item in them to get as much of the water out as you possibly can.
  • Lay the item flat to dry in its original shape.

 

Care symbols explained 


Accessories:

Jewelry

  • Remove jewelry before applying lotions and perfumes.
  • Remove jewelry when showering, heading to the gym, pool, or spa.
  • Store jewelry dry and clean.
  • Maintain metals with a polishing cloth and use a mild nonabrasive soap for your stones.

 

Candles

  • Do not burn candles in a drafty area.
  • If you notice black smoke off the flame, the wick should be trimmed.
  • To avoid “tunnelling” candles should be burned for at least an hour at a time.

 

Fragrances 

  • Store bottles away from sunlight and heat and dampness, which means not the bathroom. The bathroom has intense humidity and temperature fluctuations.
  • If you do not plan on using the fragrance for a long time, storing it in the refrigerator can keep its freshness for longer.
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How to care for your new clothing, shoes and accessories: 

Jump to sections: Footwear - Clothing - Accessories

 

How to care for your new gravitypope footwear

We love shoes and want to see your investments last. From a basic canvas slip-on to the most intricate pair of dress shoes there are steps to keep your footwear looking its best.


The number one thing to remember is to avoid excessive moisture. Water and perspiration break down the materials in a shoe. If you do get your shoes wet, dry the outside with a towel and let them air out at room temperature. Never dry them with hot air or put them in front of a heating vent as this removes natural oils from leather and can cause the sole to split. With shoes that are waterproof, feet will sweat more, and that moisture is trapped inside the shoe. Try to let the inside of the shoe dry out between wears to preserve its longevity. One of the best things you can do to keep your shoes in great condition is to have two or more pairs! Let your shoes rest between wears and they’ll last much longer.

The information provided on this page is for educational purposes only and we cannot guarantee all products and practices mentioned will work on every shoe. Our staff can always answer any questions you may have regarding a particular make and model. Email customercare@gravitypope.com for advice or call your nearest location. 

 

Three Easy Steps for Basic Leather Shoe Care

Everyday - Keep your shoes dry and dirt free. Store your shoes in a cool, dry place, away from excessive light. Use a bristle brush or rag to remove dirt from the upper. Shoe trees preserve the shape of the shoe by preventing creasing and the toes from curling upwards. Always use a shoehorn to prevent crushing the heel of your shoes.  If you get your leather shoes wet and they have been exposed to road salt, spray the shoes all over with a mixture of 1-part white vinegar to 3-parts water. This will prevent white stains and scars from occurring on the leather.

Every couple of weeks - Spray your shoes with an all-protector to waterproof and moisturize the leather. This will prevent liquids from penetrating and damaging the leather. If you get them wet, make sure to spray them as soon as they’re dry or after you have removed any dirt or spills.

Every couple of months - Clean and condition smooth leather with a moisturizing leather cleaner. This will remove dirt and restore natural oils to the leather. If colour is fading or scratched, apply a matching colour or neutral polish and buff to a shine with a soft cloth. Always re-spray with all-protector after using leather cleaner or polish. Follow extra care instructions for special leathers such as suede, nubuck or patent.

 

Extra care for special leathers

Suede - Use a suede block or brush to remove any dirt from the shoe and restore the nap of the suede. A suede block and a dry brushing can restore suede when you get your suede shoes dirty. Never wear suede with wet jeans, the indigo dye is almost impossible to remove. There are also suede renewel products that work great on black or dark brown suede. It is essentially a spray polish that rejuvenates the colour and restores the texture of the suede.

Nubuck - Use a nubuck block to restore the nap of nubuck that is dirty or has been smoothed down by wear. Sometimes people wax or oil their nubuck or it comes oiled from the designer. A small amount of leather wax or oil can be applied to nubuck to make it water repellent. Apply more of the product around the sole of the shoe and gradually move it around the entire upper.

Patent Leather - Patent leather has been covered with a layer of varnish to make the leather glossy. Use Patent Leather Cleaner to clean and protect your patent shoes. Normal all-protector will damage patent leathers shine over time. Using shoe trees or stuffing patent shoes are critical to prevent creasing and excessive wear.
 

Care for your sole

Leather soles will disintegrate quickly when they get wet. If a leather soled shoe gets wet, do not wear the shoe again until it has completely dried out.

Toppies - the best protection for your leather-soled shoes. Bring your leather-soled shoes to a cobbler to have them toppied. This is a thin rubber sole that is applied to the bottom of leather-soled shoes. Toppies will prevent the bottom of your shoe from absorbing moisture. Toppies also give you extra grip, so if you're planning on dancing in your new leather-soled shoes, a Topy is highly recommended. Toppies can be applied to any leather sled shoe or boot for a very reasonable price at any established cobbler.

Re-soling - Many leather soles shoes can be re-soled if one does not like the feel of a topy on a shoe. A complete re-soling of a show will be more expensive than replacing a topy.

 

Hardware Help

Elastics/Gussets - Use a shoehorn with new Chelsea style boots to preserve the gusset while the leather upper (the leather across the top of the foot) stretches.

Eyelets – Sometimes eyelets have sharp edges and can be filed down easily to prevent shoelaces from catching on them.

Screw Rivets – Screw rivets are used by some designers as a shoe clasp. They are great because they can be moved to adjust the fit of the shoe when needed. However, they need to periodically be tightened or they may fall off the shoe. Alternatively, you can glue in the rivet with a bit of adhesive to hold it in place more securely.

Shoelaces – Grab a bowl and a brush. Add enough Jason Markk shoe cleaner to the water to create bubbles, and submerge your laces in the water. Soak them for 15 to 20 minutes, moving the laces through the water with your hands every so often. Any stains that are still visible should scrub away easily with your brush. Repeat if necessary and air dry.

Top Lifts – The rubber piece attached to the heel of a shoe. To avoid costly repairs, it is important to replace the top lift on a shoe before wearing down into the heel. Otherwise, a cobbler will attempt to rebuild the heel to rebalance the shoes which can become expensive.

Zippers – Always zip up footwear by pulling the zipper tab outwards and upwards to unlock the zipper. Zippers will generally do up easier if you are standing. Metal zippers look great but are not as flexible as plastic zippers and may jam or break more easily. If a zipper is sticking, run a graphite pencil up and down the teeth of both sides of the zipper to lubricate it. Zippers in the back of a boot may split more easily than zippers on the side of a boot, especially if you have a high arch or instep that creates additional pressure on the zipper. If you get your zippers dirty, clean the zipper teeth with a bristly brush to remove debris that otherwise can cause the zipper to split.

 

Sneaker Care

Canvas Preventive Measures - Straight out of the box, using a product like Jason Markk's Repel shoe spray will keep dirt and dust off the canvas and soles so you have less work to do down the line. Also keeping Jason Markk's Quick Wipes on hand is important for quick cleans of your favourite shoes on the go.

Canvas Cleaning - A washing machine is the most powerful shoe cleaner you own. Most canvas sneakers can be put into the washing machine, just make sure to use cold water, as warm water sets stains and can deform the rubber soles. If your sneakers have any form of leather or suede on them, the washing machine is not recommended. This is also true for any shoes embellished with trim, beading, or rope soles. If the washing machine did not work, hand cleaning is the next option, and using a specific shoe-focused cleaner is recommended. Using Jason Markk's Premium Shoe Cleaner is a great option as it's a gentle cleaning product that does an excellent job of both conditioning and cleaning footwear, while avoiding harsh chemicals with 98.3% natural ingredients.

Take out your laces and add a small but reasonable amount of cleaner into a bowl with water. Wet a shoe brush with the soapy water and start scrubbing your shoes, keep dipping back into the bowl as necessary. To clean your laces, put the laces into the bowl and let sit, then rinse. Let dry once clean.

EVA (Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate) - Generally, any shoe made with EVA, a rubbery elastic material that's used to create soft and flexible foam, should always be hand-washed. The material is prone to absorbing water, which can change how the sneaker’s cushioning works. Spot cleaning is always the least risky way to clean sneakers. Doing so will extend the life of your sneakers.

PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) - Firstly, do not place PVC products next to leather garments as these may cause permanent stains, so if you bundle your shoe together in the closet, make sure to keep leather away from PVC. Cleaning PVC shoes is simple, use a clean damp cloth, and let dry completely before wear. Do not use stain removers as they take the finish off of the PVC.

Cork - The number one thing to avoid for the lifespan of a pair of cork soles shoes is water. Avoid wearing them in the rain, and avoid puddles, as this wears down the midsoles of the shoe quicker. If water is unavoidable, make sure to dry out quickly. As for cleaning cork-soled shoes, using a mixture of two tablespoons of water with one tablespoon of baking soda and applying/scrubbing with a cloth or toothbrush is the best bet for keeping the cork bright. After cleaning is complete, using a cork sealant like Barge Cement on the exposed cork will create a strong barrier to water.

To apply the barge cement, let them dry completely after cleaning and use a cheap foam paintbrush to spread around a small amount of the barge cement on the cork. If the suede insole is peeling, you can apply barge cement underneath the suede and press down. Let cure overnight, and they will be good to wear in the morning.

Wool - Gentle handwashing is the best bet for wool shoes, using cold water. Start by dusting off any dirt with a soft brush, like the Redecker Cashmere Brush. For areas that have stains or discoloration, use a very mild soap to wash them, like Myssy's Wool Wash. Mix a solution of water and the mild detergent in a bowl or dish and take a clean rag or cloth and dip it in the solution, then use the rag to dab the wool surface. Don’t submerge the wool or soak it in water. When you’re finished cleaning, use a clean dry cloth to dab any remaining moisture which will help the shoes or slippers dry faster.

For suede sole models, see our suede cleaning and protection section.

Satin -  The term satin does not refer to a particular type of fiber, but rather to a method of weaving fibers in a way that produces an especially smooth, glossy surface. That means satin clothes can be made from a handful of different fabrics, from silk to polyester. Always check the care label to make sure you're cleaning the garment properly.

Satin is a very delicate textile to work with, so using a washing machine, delicate bag, and gentle detergent is recommended for washing machine-appropriate clothing. If you cannot use a washing machine, handwashing is also safe. Use cold water and air dry flat, never wring out. For stains, make sure you pretreat with an enzyme-based stain remover and let sit for 10 minutes before washing.

Sequins/beading - Most clothing with embellishments like sequins or beading will state dry cleaning only, but every time you take it to a cleaner or wash it yourself damages the accents by causing them to become dull or loosen from the fabric. Try spot cleaning instead by only using a cotton swab with a water/detergent mix in certain areas that need cleaning, like a stain. If the whole garment requires cleaning, taking it to a dry cleaner will help prolong the garment's life over washing at home.

Rubber - There's no avoiding dirt and debris with rubber shoes/soles, luckily they're pretty easy to clean. We recommend using a 1:1 mixture of baking soda and detergent to clean rubber soles. Firstly remove excess dirt by brushing, then use your mixture and a damp sponge to wash the rubber. Then use a different sponge or cloth to remove the cleaning solution thoroughly. Next, dry the shoe completely, and repeat if necessary. For tough stains that don't come out using this method, you can use nail polish remover and cotton balls to spot-clean the rubber.

Fur - Fur should never be cleaned at home, and always be cleaned by either a professional furrier or a dry cleaner who specializes in cleaning fur coats once a year. Cleaning once per year will condition the leather without stripping the natural oils of the fur. Washing at home will strip the oils, ruin the pelt, and destroy the structure of the coat itself. Preventative measures can be taken like using a broad, sturdy, padded hanger to keep the shoulders from losing their shape and using a cotton bag when hanging to keep dust off it. Never hang with a plastic bag as that can trap moisture and ruin the pelt. If caught in the rain, make sure you hang it in a well-ventilated room to dry before storing it.

Gortex & other waterproof membrane products - Washing is easy and can be done in the washing machine but should be done regularly to keep water repellency active. Firstly, zip all zippers and button all buttons. Machine wash at 105°F or 40°C using a liquid detergent. Never use powder detergents, fabric softeners, stain removers, or bleach. Then line dry or dry in the dryer on the gentle/warm cycle. After completely dry, tumble dry on the normal setting for a further 20 minutes to reactivate the DWR (Durable Water Repellant) treatment. You can do this step any time you notice the water repellency needs a boost. If water seems to soak in after washing, you can reapply the DWR layer with a product of your choice.

Quilted - Always read the manufacturer's label before washing a garment. If the tag says dry clean only, trust it. For quilted garments, we recommend hand washing as the stitches can be delicate, and there's lots of stitching. Before washing your quilt, pre-treat any stains with a commercial stain remover and let sit for 10 minutes. Fill a deep laundry sink or bathtub with cold water and a gentle liquid detergent. Be certain that the sink or tub is clean and has no residue from cleaning agents, which could cause damage to the quilt. Allow the quilt to soak in the water for about 10 minutes, while gently agitating. Drain and rinse then air dry.

Shearling - Firstly, check if your shearling is faux or real. Faux shearling often contains polyester fibers along with wool. Cleaning faux shearling is typically easy as most items are usually machine-washable; just follow the instructions on the care label. For real shearling, treat stains immediately as stains can be difficult to get out of shearling once dry.

To refresh the wool, Mix a solution of warm water and 1/2 a teaspoon of Myssy's wool wash, and dip a cloth into the solution. Starting at the top of the garment, gently wipe down the wooly surfaces. Rinse the cloth often and mix a fresh batch of the cleaning solution as the soil is transferred if needed.

To deep clean the wool (not always necessary) mix a solution of lukewarm water and wool wash in a large sink or bathtub. Follow the product label guidelines as to how much to use per gallon of water. Submerge the shearling and gently squeeze the solution through the fibers for about 10 minutes. Drain the soapy water and refill the tub with cool water. Rinse by squeezing the shearling until no more suds appear. You may need to empty and refill the tub a couple of times. Lift the shearling out of the tub and gently squeeze to remove water. Do not wring! Place the shearling between two towels to help absorb excess water. Place the shearling on a drying rack and smooth it to its original shape. It is helpful to stuff boots, slippers, and purses with clean cotton towels to help them hold their shape. Replace the towels as they become wet. Allow the shearling item to air dry completely before wearing.

For the suede side of the shearling, see our suede guide.

 

Storing Footwear

Sneakers - Storing sneakers in the box they came in or on shoe racks will help keep things organized, however, if stored for a long time, the paper and cardboard in those boxes, or the outside air can dry out the shoes. Its better to store them in individual plastic boxes, which can be stacked easily, and lock in moisture. Always clean before long-term storage, and use shoe trees to keep their shape. Never store them beside another pair of shoes, as the colours can bleed over time.

Leather - Very similar to sneakers, except that leather shoes need room to breathe. Storing them in the box they came in or in a shoe bag is preferred. Always clean before long-term storage, and use shoe trees to keep their shape. Never store them beside another pair of shoes, as the colours can bleed over time. It is handy to store shoes in specific ways so remembering where they are is easy. For example, storing all your high heels together.

 

Local Shoe Cobblers in Each City

Please note these are our recommendations only based on our personal relationships with these businesses. gravitypope is not responsible for the repairs done by the following businesses.

Vancouver:

Calgary:

Edmonton:

Toronto:

 

Clothing Overview:

  • Follow care instruction on the garments tag (see graphic below).
  • Treat potential stains immediately by rinsing the area in cold water. Some mild dish soap can be used for oil based stains.
  • Avoid rubbing stained area with a cloth as it can work the stain into the fabric.
  • Warm / Hot water sets stains, if garment is stained, wash with cold water and a cold water detergent.
  • Washing frequency is a personal choice, but over-washing can be bad for the garment.
  • Avoid the dryer as much as possible. They break down the fibres of the fabric and can cause the garment to shrink and age prematurely. The dryer will also set in any stains that were not removed in the washing process.

 

Denim 

  • Denim wears and patinas with use, making it an extremely personal product. Everything you do to them, including washing, will affect how they look down the road. Keep this in mind when breaking in a new pair of denim jeans.
  • Wearing raw denim consistently and not washing them will give you a more interesting pair of jeans down the road.
  • Alternatively, washing will not hurt them, and turning jeans inside out will protect the colour.
  • Always hang to dry.
  • Wash denim separately as to not colour swap.

 

Delicates 

  • Be delicate with your delicates. Do not ignore the hand washing instructions.
  • Wash like colours together in cool water.
  • Fill a basin with cool water and a gentle detergent (Tangent, drop of mild dish soap).
  • Swirl the laundry a few times over an hour.
  • Gently squeeze out excess water.
  • Dry on a drying rack .

 

Swimwear

  • Always soak in water after use, the saltwater/chlorine breaks down the fibres and elasticity of the garment.
  • When removing water from your swimwear be sure to squish instead of wring.

Storage

  • To help knits keep their shape, always fold vs. hang.
  • Avoid overstuffing your closets as it will encourage wrinkles.
  • Zip your zippers and button your buttons.

 

Wool 

  • Hand wash on cool and use a gentle detergent like Myssy’s Wool Wash.
  • Gently squeeze the water out, do not wring, as that can stretch out and warp the fibres.
  • Dry the item out on towels, and roll up the towels with item in them to get as much of the water out as you possibly can.
  • Lay the item flat to dry in its original shape.

 

Care symbols explained 


Accessories:

Jewelry

  • Remove jewelry before applying lotions and perfumes.
  • Remove jewelry when showering, heading to the gym, pool, or spa.
  • Store jewelry dry and clean.
  • Maintain metals with a polishing cloth and use a mild nonabrasive soap for your stones.

 

Candles

  • Do not burn candles in a drafty area.
  • If you notice black smoke off the flame, the wick should be trimmed.
  • To avoid “tunnelling” candles should be burned for at least an hour at a time.

 

Fragrances 

  • Store bottles away from sunlight and heat and dampness, which means not the bathroom. The bathroom has intense humidity and temperature fluctuations.
  • If you do not plan on using the fragrance for a long time, storing it in the refrigerator can keep its freshness for longer.